• Advocacy Acronyms – a reference guide for the rest of us

    by  • September 13, 2011 • Education, Engineering, Federal Funding, Left Column 2 • 0 Comments

    Bike and pedestrian advocacy acronyms got you down? Here is a quick and easy “cheat sheet” of the most popular terms used on Bike Delaware News!

    AASHTO
    : American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials
    ADA: American Disabilities Act
    ADT: Average Daily Traffic
    ARRA: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
    ARSI: Arterial Road Signalized Intersection
    CMAQ: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality
    CMS: Congestion Management System
    CTP: Capital Transportation Program
    DNREC: Delaware Department of Natural Resources
    DOT: Department Of Transportation
    FHWA: Federal Highway Administration
    HAWK: High-Intensity Activated Crosswalk
    LAB: League of American Bicyclists
    LOS: Level-of-Service
    MPO: Metropolitan Planning Organization
    MUP: Multi-Use Path
    MUTCD: Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices
    NACTO: National Association of City Transportation Officials
    NCC: New Castle County
    NMWG: Non-Motorized Working Group
    PAC: Public Advisory Committee (of an MPO)
    ROW: Right Of Way
    RTC: Rails to Trails Conservancy
    RTOL: Right Turn-Only Lane
    RTP: Long Range Transportation Plan
    SAFETEA-LU: Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act
    SHA: State Highway Administration (i.e. Maryland)
    Sharrow: Shared Lane Marking
    SHSP: State Strategic Highway Safety Plan
    SOV: Single Occupancy Vehicle
    SRTS: Safe Routes To School
    STIP: State Transportation Improvement Program
    TAC: Technical Advisory Committee (of an MPO)
    TE: Transportation Enhancements
    TIP: Transportation Improvement Program
    TMA: Transportation Management Association
    VMT: Vehicle Miles Traveled
    WCBC: White Clay Bicycle Club
    WILMAPCO: Wilmington Area Planning Council

    And last, but not least ….

    SALMON: Contraflow bicyclist (illegally opposing traffic), or?

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