• Bring on the havoc. Bring on the wobbly cyclists.

    by  • July 18, 2013 • Safety • 2 Comments

    by James D. Schwartz
    Published at the Urban Country

    It’s no coincidence that drivers are more aware and cautious on streets that have more cyclists as opposed to streets where there are very few cyclists. Furthermore, wobbly cyclists are traveling slow and have more time to react to car doors and other objects they may encounter while riding in the city…

    More bicycles = more cautious drivers. Inexperienced cyclists create a calming effect on our drivers. And if that’s what it takes to slow down automobiles in our city, then great – because road engineers aren’t doing much to slow down traffic at the moment.

    I say bring on the havoc. Bring on the wobbly cyclists.

    Actor Bruce Willis riding a Citi Bike to an appearance on the David Letterman show on Monday.

    Actor Bruce Willis riding a Citi Bike to an appearance on the David Letterman show on Monday.

    Read entire article at Urban Country HERE>>>

    RELATED:

    • Wobbly Bicyclists Calm Traffic

    • From London to D.C., Bike-Sharing Is Safer Than Riding Your Own Bike

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    2 Responses to Bring on the havoc. Bring on the wobbly cyclists.

    1. Amy Wilburn
      July 26, 2013 at 1:06 am

      This is interesting and it’s well known that the more cyclists, the safer the streets for both cars and cyclists. I also think that bike share programs are great. But it’s important to make sure that the statistics aren’t comparing apples to oranges. Comparing number of trips may not cut it, because the length and location of trips may vary. So let’s say the average length of trip for someone on a personal bike is 5 miles, but the average length of trip is 2 miles for the bike share program. Then if a third of the trips are taken by bike share but a fourth of the crashes involve bike share users, you have more crashes per mile ridden by the bike share users. So then are the wobbly riders safer? And the bike share users may stick to downtown, whereas the folks riding personal bikes may be riding further afield with conditions that are less safe. Even the presence of hills vs. flat can impact the number of crashes. Not saying it ain’t so, but statistics can be interpreted many ways and lead to multiple conclusions.

    2. September 20, 2014 at 7:57 pm

      I was wondering if you ever considered changing the
      page layout of your site? Its very well written; I love
      what youve got to say. But maybe you could a little more in the way of
      content so people could connect with it better. Youve
      got an awful lot of text for only having
      one or two pictures. Maybe you could space it out
      better?

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